interview tips

A general list of interview tips can be found below. If you have any concerns or questions about your interview, please email your Teacher Representative in advance and they'll be happy to help.

1. 

Skype. Make sure that you have Skype installed and that it's running smoothly and on a reliable internet connection. Please ensure that we have your current Skype name on hand as well. 

If you don't currently have Skype, you can download it here for free.

2. 

Be ready for the call. The times for interviews will be consistent, depending on your country. If you live in North America, the schools usually call around 11am, KOREA TIME. This is 10pm EST, when it is not daylight savings time. If you live in England, South Africa, New Zealand or Australia the schools generally call around 5-6pm, KOREA TIME. This time converting clock, should help you ensure that you get the time right.

Make sure you're in a quiet spot, with no distractions and outside noise, so you can focus on the interview. 

3.

Be ready for anything, even a very casual interview. We are often asked what types of interview questions to expect, but they can vary dramatically. You might be asked about class control, culture shock in such a different country, or even if you have ever seen anyone do drugs (always deny any drug use or knowledge, since Korean culture is not accepting of drugs). Sometimes teachers email us later saying they must not have done well in the interview, since it was so short. This is not the case, it was just a casual interview. Some interviewers may be intimidated by interviewing someone in English, which is usually one of the main reasons why interviews are not drawn out. Their main focus is on making sure you speak clearly and enthusiastically. 

In China, the interview process is a bit more formalized and if you do well, you'll be asked to attend a demo interview and mock lesson for the school. Plenty of time is given for the interviewee to ask questions about the school, city and contract details.

4.

Ask some questions. Make sure you ask a few questions about the school. Schools do not want to hire tourists, so you need to show a genuine interest in helping kids learn the English language. When interviewing with Korean schools, try not to bombard the interviewer with questions, as you may seem picky, or just intimidating if the interviewers level of English is not too high. We can always get you the answers to any questions, so feel free to send any you have through us.

When interviewing with schools in China, you may ask questions about the school, city or contract and the level of the interviewers English is usually very proficient. 

5.

Be aware of your accent. Schools in general prefer applicants with a North American accent as they feel that it will be easier for their students to understand. Speak slowly and clearly, as you would to group of students, but don't slow it down too much. Try to take cues from the interviewer.

6.

Speak in full sentences, even if the interviewer might not understand every word. Avoid "Yes" and "No" answers as they might indicate that you're not engaged. Focus on your pronunciations, since if your interviewer can't understand you, the  students won't be able to either. 

7.

Be energetic, sincere and flexible. Schools are looking for these qualities in a teacher, so show them that you are excited at the prospect of teaching in their country. Be confident and enthusiastic about your abilities as an English teacher. 

8.

Be prepared to make a decision. Schools in Korea usually expect a decision within 2-3 days as they may have other applicants to consider. The current job market in Korea works in the school's favour as there are currently more applicants than jobs, especially for cities such as Seoul and Busan, which are in high demand. If you wait too long to make a decision, the school might move on to the next applicant.

9.

Documents. If you're close to having your documents in hand, you can mention this to the interviewer. Schools in Korea especially, want to hire teachers who are organized and prepared. They don't want to be left worrying that the teacher won't be able to make the start date, because their documents are not ready in time.

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